ADDICTION  &  PSYCHOLOGICAL THERAPY INC.
811 W Chester Pk   West Chester, Pa 19382
Office 610-696-0325   Cell 610-308-2290

 

 

OFFICE HOURS

Monday           8:00am - 9:00pm

Tuesday          8:00am - 9:00pm

Wednesday     8:00am - 9:00pm

Thursday         8:00am - 9:00pm

Friday              8:00am - 4:00pm

 

 

INSURANCE

Aetna
Amerihealth
Benefit Concepts
BC/BS of (PA, DE and NJ)
Carebridge
Cigna
Comp Psych
Devon Health Care
Great West
Kestone
Magellan
Some Medicare Plans
MHN
Penn Care
Personal Choice
Preferential Care Network
Total Care Network
United Health Care
Value Options

 

 

News:    U.S. Dept. of
Health & Human Services

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Depression in Children

Can Children Really Suffer From Depression?

Yes. Childhood depression is different from the normal "blues" and everyday emotions that occur as a child develops. Just because a child seems depressed or sad, does not necessarily mean they have depression. But if these symptoms become persistent, disruptive, and interfere with social activities, interests, schoolwork and family life, it may indicate that he or she has the medical illness called depression. Keep in mind that while depression is a serious illness, it is also a treatable one.

How Can I Tell if My Child is Depressed?

The symptoms of depression in children vary. It is often undiagnosed and untreated because they are passed off as normal emotional and psychological changes that occur during growth. Early medical studies focused on "masked" depression, where a child's depressed mood was evidenced by acting out or angry behavior. While this does occur, particularly in younger children, many children display sadness or low mood similar to adults who are depressed. The primary symptoms of depression revolve around sadness, a feeling of hopelessness, and mood changes.

Signs and symptoms of depression in children include:

* Irritability or anger
* Continuous feelings of sadness, hopelessness
* Social withdrawal
* Increased sensitivity to rejection
* Changes in appetite -- either increased or decreased
* Changes in sleep -- sleeplessness or excessive sleep
* Vocal outbursts or crying
* Difficulty concentrating
* Fatigue and low energy
* Physical complaints (such as stomachaches, headaches) that do not respond to treatment
* Reduced ability to function during events and activities at home or with friends, in school, extracurricular activities, and in other hobbies or interests
* Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
* Impaired thinking or concentration
* Thoughts of death or suicide

Not all children have all of these symptoms. In fact, most will display different symptoms at different times and in different settings. Although some children may continue to function reasonably well in structured environments, most kids with significant depression will suffer a noticeable change in social activities, loss of interest in school and poor academic performance, or a change in appearance. Children may also begin using drugs or alcohol, especially if they are over the age of 12.

Although relatively rare in youths under 12, young children do attempt suicide -- and may do so impulsively when they are upset or angry. Girls are more likely to attempt suicide, but boys are more likely to actually kill themselves when they make an attempt. Children with a family history of violence, alcohol abuse, or physical or sexual abuse are at greater risk for suicide, as are those with depressive symptoms.

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